Thursday, February 21st

State

Josh Kaul(Photo11: Associated Press)

MADISON - If Wisconsin stays in a lawsuit challenging the Affordable Care Act, it likely will not switch sides, the state's attorney general said Thursday.

Republican lawmakers have kept Wisconsin in the lawsuit despite opposition from Democratic Gov. Tony Evers and Democratic Attorney General Josh Kaul.

Evers last month suggested Wisconsin could change its stance in the case so that it sided with states trying to keep the Affordable Care Act in place rather than ones trying to overturn it.

But in an interview Thursday, Kaul said he probably wouldn't do that.

"I haven't assessed that issue in any sort of in-depth manner, but the state is in the case and has been in the case on one side of the case and it would be extremely unusual in that circumstance to switch sides," Kaul said. "So my expectation is that if the state remains in the case it will remain in the case on the same side that it's on.

Supreme Court candidate Brian Hagedorn, a state appeals court judge, helped found a religious private school that bars employees, students and parents from being gay.(Photo11: Associated Press)

MADISON - A candidate for the state Supreme Court created a private religious school that prohibits teachers, students and parents from being in gay relationships — a rule drawing criticism from liberals and gay advocates who say the policy is "disqualifying."

State Appeals Court judge Brian Hagedorn in 2016 founded and now oversees Augustine Academy in Merton, which partners with Ambleside Schools International, a Christian, college-preparatory school that blends private and home-based education. 

The school's statement of faith says the school community believes that "Adam and Eve were made to complement each other in a one-flesh union that establishes the only normative pattern of sexual relations for men and women, such that marriage ultimately serves as a type of the union between Christ and his church." 

In its code of personal conduct listed on the school teacher application, school officials say teachers may be fired and students may be disciplined or forced to withdraw from the school if they or their parents violate the code's policies.

Supreme Court candidate Brian Hagedorn, a state appeals court judge, helped found a religious private school that bars employees, students and parents from being gay.(Photo: Associated Press)

MADISON - A candidate for the state Supreme Court created a private religious school that prohibits teachers, students and parents from being in gay relationships — a rule drawing criticism from liberals and gay advocates who say the policy is "disqualifying."

State Appeals Court judge Brian Hagedorn in 2016 founded and now oversees Augustine Academy in Merton, which partners with Ambleside Schools International, a Christian, college-preparatory school that blends private and home-based education. 

The school's statement of faith says the school community believes that "Adam and Eve were made to complement each other in a one-flesh union that establishes the only normative pattern of sexual relations for men and women, such that marriage ultimately serves as a type of the union between Christ and his church." 

In its code of personal conduct listed on the school teacher application, school officials say teachers may be fired and students may be disciplined or forced to withdraw from the school if they or their parents violate the code's policies.

MADISON - Republicans and Democrats in Wisconsin agreed on the outlines of an income tax cut for the middle class, but they're nowhere near a deal they can finalize to put money in people's pockets. 

The Senate voted 19-14 Wednesday on a GOP version of the tax cut, with all Republicans for it and all Democrats against it. The Senate approval for the measure came a day after the Assembly signed off on it on party lines. 

The plan now goes to Democratic Gov. Tony Evers, who opposes the deal because of its long-term effect on the state's finances. 

He's all but said he will veto it. Republicans, meanwhile, say they won't ever accept Evers' proposed tax cut because it would scale back a tax break for manufacturers. 

RELATED: Assembly passes GOP-backed middle-class tax cut that Tony Evers is likely to veto

RELATED: Tony Evers and GOP lawmakers pledge to block each other's plans to cut taxes

MADISON - Republicans in the state Senate rejected a move Wednesday by black lawmakers to recognize Colin Kaepernick as part of Black History Month — prompting Democrats to oppose a ceremonial resolution that usually gains broad bipartisan support. 

The turn of events meant that both of the state's black senators, Lena Taylor and LaTonya Johnson, voted against a measure meant to celebrate Black History Month.

The pair expressed frustration that white legislators excised the National Football League quarterback's name from the long list of those worthy of praise. 

"This year all of the sudden for the first time we’ve been told that we have to have permission to determine who we want to honor for Black History Month," Taylor said on the Senate floor. "I have not seen it when we’ve honored any other group, any other thing."

She said white Republicans have maintained "they’re best suited to decide for African-Americans what we should value, who we should honor.