Sunday, July 23rd

State

Mayor Tom Barrett presents his 2017 budget to the Milwaukee Common Council on Sept. 26, 2016.(Photo: Michael Sears / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

The drive to recall Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett is being led publicly by a bunch of political wannabes and nobodies. 

But behind the scenes, the recall campaign is getting a helping hand from a more powerful foe of the fourth-term mayor: Milwaukee Professional Fire Fighters Local 215

"Petitions to recall Tom Barrett are available at the union hall," said a July 7 email from the union. "Must be a citizen of Milwaukee to sign. Absolutely no literature in the firehouses. No solicitations of signatures while on duty. No signing the petition on duty."

The email from the firefighters union then directed recipients to read a Journal Sentinel story on the recall drive.

If that weren't enough, Darryl Gardner — who goes by the name King Rick — of the Original Black Panthers of Milwaukee was also directing people to the union last week.

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Cars sit in high water at Pine St. in Burlington just north of E. Market St. due to heavy rains.(Photo: Mike De Sisti, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo

The flooded Fox River continued to recede Sunday as authorities opened up the County Highway F bridge near the Fox River Park entrance.

The closure signs at County Highway F were removed around 3 p.m. Sunday, according to Kenosha County authorities. The bridge over County Highway F at the Fox River and the area just west of the bridge are now passable.

Weather conditions are expected to be dry on Monday with the next system moving in to the state Tuesday afternoon, which could be one of several storms that might move across the area later in the week bringing heavy rain, according to the National Weather Service. 

The Fox River at Burlington was at minor flood stage of 11.7 feet Sunday afternoon and is expected to drop below flood stage by Tuesday.

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Mary Brown and her three children, in Appleton Wis. Mary has battled alcohol and drug addiction since her high school days. She has given up custody of her children twice during her battle for sobriety. Wm. Glasheen/USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin Wm. Glasheen/USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin

More kids are living with relatives or in foster care as their parents fall into drug addiction, leaving social workers scrambling to keep them safe Buy Photo

Mary Brown and her daughter Madison Taylor wash dishes at their home on Monday, June 26, 2017, in Appleton Wis. Mary has battled alcohol and drug addiction since her high school days. She has given up custody of her children during two of three stints in rehab. Today, clean and sober, she is staying focused on raising her children and on the quiet joy of being a mother.

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Northern lights are seen in a 30-second exposure taken at Elsworth Park in Bayside on Oct. 24, 2011.(Photo: Mike De Sisti / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo

With a little bit of luck and the right conditions, folks in Wisconsin could get a peek at the aurora borealis Sunday night.

The best time to see the northern lights in Wisconsin should be between 10 p.m. Sunday and 1 a.m. Monday, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's radar. 

The illuminated sky is the result of a solar flare that erupted out of a sunspot late Thursday into early Friday. The flare released a wave of charged particles that take a few days to reach Earth. The northern lights form when those sun particles meet the Earth's magnetic field. The particles interact with molecules of atmospheric gases to create the famed glowing red and green colors.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issued a geomagnetic storm watch Friday and expects a "moderate" storm, a 2 out of 5 on its severity scale.

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Wisconsin faces long-term shortfalls in its roads fund, and a disagreement over how to pay for bridge and highway projects has held up the state budget.(Photo: Mike De Sisti / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo

MADISON - Wisconsin road projects could be designed and built by the same firm and their workers could be paid less, under new GOP legislation aimed at lowering the costs of highway construction. 

The state faces long-term shortfalls in its roads fund, and a disagreement over how to pay for bridge and highway projects has held up the state budget. 

To help address that, a group of GOP lawmakers introduced legislation this month that they said would help to close the funding gap by lowering costs. 

The bill would repeal the state's "prevailing wage" law requiring certain minimum pay levels for construction workers. It would also clear the way in Wisconsin for design-build firms that both draw up plans for highway projects and construct them.