Sunday, July 23rd

State

The Fox River flooding hits Burlington.(Photo: Jordyn Noennig, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

BURLINGTON - Flooding last week on the Fox River destroyed all the cash in the vault at Fox River State Bank.

Bank president Keith Polleck would not disclose how much money was ruined but said the Federal Reserve will have to replace every dollar.

Polleck told WISN-TV that the vault is water resistant but not waterproof. As the Fox River rose above flood stage, water flooded the bank, rising up to 21 inches deep inside the facility.

Now that the river is back below flood stage, restoration crews have started to clean up. Carpets have been ripped out. Drywall is being replaced. The bank’s documents are drying, though most are backed up electronically.

Republican Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (left), Gov. Scott Walker (center) and Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (right).(Photo: Associated Press)

MADISON – Hoping to move past a budget stalemate, Republicans in the state Senate on Tuesday will make public their plans for schools, transportation and tax cuts.

For months, those issues — particularly transportation — have divided Republicans who control state government. Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau) hopes that spelling out his caucus' specific plans will help break the legislative logjam. 

It's not clear that it will. Republicans in the Assembly are at odds with the GOP senators when it comes to paying for roads. 

A new budget was supposed to be in place by July 1. Funding will continue at the levels set in the last budget until a new spending plan is approved. If the stalemate continues, some road work could be delayed as early as Aug. 8. 

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (R-Rochester) has been urging Senate Republicans to make their plans clear and he cheered their decision to hold Tuesday's news conference.

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Tim Donohue (left), director of the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center at UW Madison's Wisconsin Energy Institute building, shows visitors the lab where they are studying alternative clean fuels such as corn and switchgrass as sources for clean energy during a tour in 2014.(Photo: Rick Wood / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo

The U.S. Department of Energy announced Monday the University of Wisconsin-Madison will receive a new, five-year round of funding for its energy research center that has produced 160 patents and spawned five start-up companies in its 10-year history.

But the exact level of federal funding remains unclear and the announcement comes at a time of deep budget cuts at the Energy Department under President Donald Trump's administration. 

RELATED: UW, Morgridge scientists' breakthrough in engineered arteries could be used to treat heart disease

In a statement, the Energy Department said that it was funding four research centers, including the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center at UW-Madison, for a total of $40 million in the federal government's 2018 fiscal year.

Gov. Scott Walker.(Photo: Scott Bauer, Associated Press)

MADISON - Gov. Scott Walker signed 11 bills Monday to combat the state's opiate epidemic, including one that would establish a charter school for recovering addicts.

Another bill would ease the way for school employees around the state to administer a drug that halts the effects of overdoses. Others would funnel more money into fighting opioid abuse, tighten the rules for getting some drugs from pharmacies and give doctors more guidance on treating addiction.

The measures were taken up in a special legislative session the Republican governor called starting in January. They enjoyed broad bipartisan support.

“We’ve taken serious steps to combat this issue, including creating the Governor’s Task Force on Opioid Abuse, but we won’t stop until there are zero opioid overdoses in Wisconsin," Walker said in a statement.

But Senate Minority Leader Jennifer Shilling (D-Milwaukee) said the state should be doing more on the issue. 

“It doesn’t make sense to wait until someone is already hooked and battling an opioid addiction," she said in a statement.

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Tim Donohue (left), director of the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center at UW Madison's Wisconsin Energy Institute building, shows visitors the lab where they are studying alternative clean fuels such as corn and switchgrass as sources for clean energy during a tour in 2014.(Photo: Rick Wood / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo

The U.S. Department of Energy announced Monday the University of Wisconsin-Madison will receive a new, five-year round of funding for its energy research center that has produced 160 patents and spawned five start-up companies in its 10-year history.

But the exact level of federal funding remains unclear and the announcement comes at a time of deep budget cuts at the Energy Department under President Donald Trump's administration. 

RELATED: UW, Morgridge scientists' breakthrough in engineered arteries could be used to treat heart disease

In a statement, the Energy Department said that it was funding four research centers, including the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center at UW-Madison, for a total of $40 million in the federal government's 2018 fiscal year.