Sunday, July 23rd

State

A teen is shackled to a table at Lincoln Hills School for Boys. He and others like him have less than 8 inches to maneuver as they try to do school work.(Photo: ACLU, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

MADISON - A federal judge ruled Thursday that videos of juvenile inmates being hit with pepper spray at Lincoln Hills School for Boys, but barred anyone from disclosing the names or identifying information about of the inmates. 

"It’s important that we know what goes on in the courts and it’s important that we know what goes on at Lincoln Hills," U.S. District Judge James Peterson said. 

The ruling came at the outset of a court hearing that will put the problems at Wisconsin's juvenile prison in open court for the first time.

The lawsuit, brought by teen inmates, is seeking to curb the use of pepper spray and solitary confinement at Lincoln Hills and Copper Lake School for Girls, which share a campus north of Wausau.

A teen is shackled to a table at Lincoln Hills School for Boys. He and others like him have less than 8 inches to maneuver as they try to do school work.(Photo: ACLU, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

MADISON - A federal judge ruled Thursday that videos of juvenile inmates being hit with pepper spray at Lincoln Hills School for Boys, but barred anyone from disclosing the names or identifying information about of the inmates. 

"It’s important that we know what goes on in the courts and it’s important that we know what goes on at Lincoln Hills," U.S. District Judge James Peterson said. 

The ruling came at the outset of a court hearing that will put the problems at Wisconsin's juvenile prison in open court for the first time.

The lawsuit, brought by teen inmates, is seeking to curb the use of pepper spray and solitary confinement at Lincoln Hills and Copper Lake School for Girls, which share a campus north of Wausau.

A teen is shackled to a table at Lincoln Hills School for Boys. He and others like him have less than 8 inches to maneuver as they try to do school work.(Photo: ACLU, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

MADISON — The problems at Wisconsin's juvenile prison will be laid out in open court for the first time Thursday during a hearing brought by teen inmates seeking to curb the use of pepper spray and solitary confinement.

The hearing before U.S. District Judge James Peterson is to determine whether he should put in place an initial injunction greatly reducing the use of solitary confinement, pepper spray and handcuffs and other restraints.

Those bringing the lawsuit plan to show two or three videos of inmates being doused with pepper spray to make their argument that the practice should be curbed. They have asked the judge to close the courtroom to the public while those videos are shown because they have not had time to blur the faces of juvenile inmates or edit out the use of their names.

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Wisconsin Supreme Court justices recently voted 5-2 to reject a petition supported by 54 retired Wisconsin judges who urged the court to set formal recusal rules requiring recusal when Wisconsin judges have received more than a certain amount of money from a party appearing before it.(Photo: Rick Wood / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo

MADISON - The Wisconsin Supreme Court voted Thursday to keep more of its deliberations behind closed doors. 

The decision – on a 5-2 vote – came amid acrimony that has come to mark the court in recent years.

The Wisconsin Supreme Court, like other courts, has always conducted its arguments on cases in public and its deliberations about those cases behind closed doors.

But in 1999, the court became one of the first state high courts — if not the first — to hold its administrative meetings before the public. At the meetings, shown live in recent years on the WisconsinEye Public Affairs Network, the justices discussed issues both meaty and mundane, many of them pertaining to court policies.