Tuesday, May 21st

State

Environmental DNA of six Asian carp was recently detected in Lake Calumet on the far south side of Chicago, a few miles from Lake Michigan, but subsequent testing has not turned up any actual carp.   

This silver carp was caught in the Illinois Waterway below T.J. O’Brien Lock and Dam, approximately nine miles away from Lake Michigan. The Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee says an autopsy shows the 4-year-old male silver carp originated in the Illinois/Middle Mississippi watershed. That would suggest the carp somehow evaded three electric barriers 37 miles from the lake.(Photo: Associated Press)

The discovery of genetic material of silver and bighead carp is the latest found in recent years in Lake Calumet, which is about five miles from Lake Michigan. 

Bighead and silver carp have infested the Mississippi and Illinois rivers, and scientists believe that if the fish establish themselves in Lake Michigan and the other lakes, they could edge out native Great Lakes fish and threaten a $7 billion fishing industry.

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Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (R-Rochester, left) and Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau). Fitzgerald is holding off confirming cabinet appointments by Governor Tony Evers.(Photo: Mark Hoffman/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

MADISON - Republican lawmakers are trying to intervene in a lawsuit over Wisconsin's labor laws, marking the fifth set of cases they have tried to involve themselves in since last year. 

Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald of Juneau announced Monday that he and other GOP legislative leaders would seek to intervene in a recent lawsuit over Act 10, the 2011 law that sharply limited collective bargaining for most public employees in Wisconsin. 

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Fitzgerald did not immediately say what law firm they would use or what it would cost taxpayers. In many of the other cases, lawyers are billing taxpayers $500 an hour. 

Republican lawmakers have had mixed success in trying to join other lawsuits.

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Gov. Tony Evers speaks as he and Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes (left) held a news conference regarding Medicaid expansion.(Photo: Mike De Sisti / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

MADISON - Gov. Tony Evers suggested Monday that top Republicans would not meet with his aides because of sexism, but refused to address the issue directly. 

The Democratic governor initially would not address whether he agreed with his lead spokeswoman that GOP leaders wouldn't negotiate with his chief of staff because she is a woman. But he later issued a statement implying Assembly Speaker Robin Vos of Rochester and Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald of Juneau weren't meeting with his aides because of sexism. 

"Only Robin Vos and Scott Fitzgerald can say why they won’t work with the women who are leading my office," Evers said in his statement. "I have asked Republicans to work with my staff the way they worked with the former governor’s staff.

Gov. Scott Walker is shown during a 2018 campaign stop in Waukesha.(Photo: Bill Glauber / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

MADISON - Scott Walker has again ignored a request from an award-winning Wauwatosa high school teacher to quit using her name to make a point about collective bargaining — nearly a decade after she first said she wanted the former governor to stop.

Wauwatosa East High School English teacher Megan Sampson earned national attention in 2011 when Walker first used her experience of being laid off from her first teaching job in a column published in the Wall Street Journal defending his work to effectively end collective bargaining for public school teachers.

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Sampson said then, and again in 2015, that she didn't want Walker to cite her experience to champion the law known as Act 10. But eight years later, Walker is still ignoring the teacher's wishes even after leaving the governor's office.

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Gov. Tony Evers speaks as he and Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes (left) held a news conference regarding Medicaid expansion.(Photo: Mike De Sisti / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

MADISON - Gov. Tony Evers refused to say Monday whether he agreed with his lead spokeswoman that Republican leaders wouldn't negotiate with his chief of staff because she is a woman.  

Over the weekend, Evers spokeswoman Melissa Baldauff said GOP leaders weren't talking with the Democratic governor's chief of staff, Maggie Gau, and others because they were "clearly uncomfortable or simply unwilling to work with a leadership team made up entirely of women."  

But Evers declined to say Monday whether he agreed with that assessment. He also deflected a question about abortion legislation, saying he was holding his news conference to talk only about his support for automatic voter registration. 

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