Sunday, September 24th

News

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, Aug. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Widely used heartburn drugs called proton pump inhibitors do not appear to increase Alzheimer's disease risk, according to a new study.

Prilosec, Nexium and Prevacid are commonly used proton pump inhibitors.

Two previous studies reported a higher risk of dementia among people who took the drugs, which are commonly used by older adults. Proton pump inhibitors work by reducing the production of stomach acid.

But this new study found that use of the drugs was not associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's, even among those who took a higher dose or used the drugs for more than three years.

The findings are from an analysis of data from Finland on nearly 71,000 Alzheimer's disease patients and nearly 283,000 people without the disease.

The study shows people need not avoid the drugs due to fears about developing Alzheimer's, said the University of Eastern Finland researchers led by Heidi Taipale, a postdoctoral researcher.

ETTRICK — South Beaver Creek Lutheran Church, rural Ettrick, will celebrate its 150th anniversary with two special events:

On Sunday, Sept. 24, the congregation will present a history pageant during the 10:30 a.m. service. The pageant, which is being performed by the confirmation class, will be educational, inspiring and fun. Those attending are encouraged to wear pioneer-era costume, and bring old cars and tractors to display.

The second event is the 150th anniversary festival worship service at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 1. The Rev. Roger Benrud, a retired ELCA pastor, will preach the sermon. After the service, a catered meal will be served. The cost is $10 and $5 for children 5 and younger; call 608-525-4681 to make meal reservations.

MADISON (AP) — Democratic state Sen. Kathleen Vinehout plans to announce she is running for governor on Monday.

An email sent from one of her supporters urging attendance at her campaign kickoff event in Black River Falls spilled the news Friday.

Vinehout joins six other declared Democratic candidates who are vying for a chance to take on Republican Gov. Scott Walker in next year's election. Walker is expected to formally jump into the race in early November.

Vinehout has been in the state Senate since 2007 and also ran for governor during the Walker recall in 2012.

Democrats already in the race include state Superintendent Tony Evers, Milwaukee businessman Andy Gronik, state Rep.

Vance White, 34, was arrested Wednesday in Black River Falls for three drug-related offenses including possession of 5.5 grams of methamphetamine with intent to deliver.

A Jackson County Sheriff's deputy spotted White walking down the street in downtown Black River Falls. White was wanted and so the deputy attempted to apprehend White, so he fled a short distance on foot. 

Before White was apprehended, he attempted to hide a container by throwing it onto the roof of a local business. After the arrest, the container was found and had about 5.5 grams of suspected crystal methamphetamine. The drugs were individually packaged and a digital scale was in the container.

White was arrested and charged with possession of methamphetamine with intent to deliver, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and resisting arrest.

A La Crosse County judge has dismissed a three-year-old lawsuit brought against Trempealeau County by an Iowa sand mining company denied a permit for a frac sand operation.

The case was brought by AllEnergy Corp. of Des Moines, which sought to operate a 265-acre frac sand mine along with a processing plant and rail loading terminal in the town of Arcadia.

In 2013, the Trempealeau County Environment and Land Use Committee voted 5-3 to deny the permit, saying AllEnergy’s application was rushed and incomplete; that the proposed mine raised environmental concerns and would have adverse effects on the landscape, wildlife, and recreation; and that it posed risks to health, culture, and social conditions.

AllEnergy sued the county in 2014, claiming the denial was arbitrary and singled out the company in violation of its constitutional rights.

Five of nine rooms in the E&F Motel have been placarded and deemed unsafe, but Black River Falls city officials are moving forward this week with an inspection warrant to deem if the property can be repaired or if it should be torn down.

The city and county are concerned about structural health and safety in the E&F Motel after Jackson County Public Health placarded five rooms December 2015 because improvements were not made following a routine inspection.

Black River Falls city attorney Dan Diehn has written an affidavit for an inspection warrant for the property, which needs to be signed by city law enforcement and then brought to a Jackson County judge for approval.

“The judge will then review the material in the affidavit and if the judge believes there is reasonable cause to allow the inspection, the judge will sign the warrant,” Diehn said.

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