Saturday, July 22nd

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By Robert Preidt

TUESDAY, July 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to vitamin supplements, more is not always better, according to a new study that found even high doses of vitamin D don't protect children from colds in the winter.

"We may have just busted a myth," said study leader Dr. Jonathon Maguire.

"Our findings do not support the routine use of high-dose vitamin D supplementation for the prevention of wintertime upper respiratory tract infections among healthy children," added Maguire. He is a pediatrician at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto.

Vitamin D is often called the "sunshine" vitamin, because human skin manufactures the nutrient upon contact with sunlight. It's also found in certain foods, such as fatty fish. But many people now take a daily vitamin D supplement, as well.

For the past 30 years, it's been thought that vitamin D can help prevent or reduce the severity of colds and other respiratory tract infections in children, Maguire noted.

By Dennis Thompson

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. doctors are discarding donated kidneys that could keep people alive for years, simply because the organs are not top-quality, a new study claims.

"Suboptimal" kidneys from older donors with health problems perform much better than expected, and would preserve a patient's life much longer than dialysis, said lead researcher Dr. Sumit Mohan. He is an associate professor for medicine & epidemiology at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health.

About 73 percent of lower-quality kidneys received by Columbia patients were still functioning five years after transplant, Mohan and his colleagues found.

"To our surprise, yes, they did worse than the best-quality kidneys, but they didn't do that poorly," Mohan said.

By comparison, the five-year survival rate for kidney patients on dialysis is about 35 percent, Mohan said.

"If I don't get a kidney, my alternative is to stay on dialysis," Mohan said.

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Are your family dinners usually coming out of take-out bags these days? Or can you not remember the last time you even had dinner together?

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Sometimes it isn't easy to pay attention to all four parts of the FIT Platform -- MOVE, FOOD, RECHARGE, and MOOD -- all the time. You have school and activities and chores and friends. That means good health habits might not seem so important, but they really are!

It’s time to hit the reset button on your family’s eating habits. That means your whole family needs to make some changes, says Natalie Muth, MD, a spokesperson for the American Academy of Pediatrics. But where to begin? Set one or two goals and see how your family does.

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When your kids were little, you taught them their ABCs. You taught them not to bite their friends. But now that they’re older, have you taught them how to manage their moods?

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Ever hear a rumor -- something that isn’t true? A tall tale? A fake fact? A lie? Well, there are rumors out there about stress. So why do you care? Stress feels bad. Stress can also make it hard to make smart, healthy choices. It can be hard to think when you’ve got worries on your mind. But when you know the truth about stress, you can make healthy choices and stop stress. So let's bust some rumors about stress!

is at the center of a lot of the choices your kids will make, like what to eat, how much to sleep, and whether or not to exercise.

By Dennis Thompson

THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. doctors are discarding donated kidneys that could keep people alive for years, simply because the organs are not top-quality, a new study claims.

"Suboptimal" kidneys from older donors with health problems perform much better than expected, and would preserve a patient's life much longer than dialysis, said lead researcher Dr. Sumit Mohan, an assistant professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health.

About 73 percent of lower-quality kidneys received by Columbia patients were still functioning five years after transplant, Mohan and his colleagues found.

"To our surprise, yes, they did worse than the best-quality kidneys, but they didn't do that poorly," Mohan said.

By comparison, the five-year survival rate for kidney patients on dialysis is about 35 percent, Mohan said.

"If I don't get a kidney, my alternative is to stay on dialysis," Mohan said.

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

A snortable chocolate powder called Coco Loko is raising questions in the medical community.

The product, which is not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, first appeared on store shelves about a month ago.

"The question is, what are the risks of doing it?" Dr. Andrew Lane, director of the Johns Hopkins Sinus Center, told the Washington Post. "There's no data, and as far as I can tell, no one's studied what happens if you inhale chocolate into your nose. When I mention it to people, nobody's ever heard of it."

Health experts have long voiced concerns about the health risks of energy drinks, which contain stimulants and have been shown to increase blood pressure and cause heart palpitations. Those effects could be magnified if a person inhales a stimulant, according to Lane.

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