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The Didion Milling Plant is seen after an explosion killed at least two employees and injured several others in Cambria, Wis.(Photo: Wisconsin State Journal)

CAMBRIA - A Wisconsin company says a fourth worker has died after an explosion at its corn milling plant.

Didion Milling released a statement saying 46-year-old Angel Reyes died Tuesday at the University of Wisconsin Hospital in Madison.

The company says Reyes was a pack operator at the plant and died from injuries he suffered in the explosion last week.

The blast and fire destroyed the corn milling plant in Cambria, a community about 45 miles northeast of Madison. The bodies of three other workers were recovered from the rubble.

Some employees have started returning to work at the mill complex. A neighboring ethanol plant was not damaged.

 

Wisconsin Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (R-Rochester).(Photo: Scott Bauer, Associated Press)

MADISON – Assembly leaders unveiled an education plan Tuesday that would put more money into classrooms and cut property taxes, but the idea was immediately rebuffed by their fellow Republicans in the Senate.

It was the latest sign that work on the state budget is stalled even though Republicans enjoy complete control of state government. 

"I'm willing to negotiate at any time, any place, anywhere," Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (R-Rochester) said at a news conference. 

But there was no evidence that would happen any time soon. 

Minutes before Vos and two dozen of his Assembly colleagues convened their news conference, Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau) issued a statement saying his caucus would stick with the plan proposed this spring by Gov. Scott Walker. 

"We will continue to look for ways to support low-spending districts, but a proposal that raises property taxes (compared to Walker's plan) and picks winners and losers within our school districts is a move away from the position of both the governor and the Senate Republican caucus," Fitzgerald's statement said.

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Hole No. 18 at Erin Hills, site of the 2017 U.S. Open June 15-18.(Photo: Rick Wood, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo

Organizers of next week's U.S. Open at Erin Hills announced Wednesday they have shifted one of the two main spectator parking lots.

The RED Lot has been moved to Washington County Fair Park in West Bend.

Officials are using two remote sites with complimentary parking to funnel most fans to the course, which is located in the Town of Erin. After parking, fans will go through security check points and board buses for the course.

The RED Lot is to accommodate fans traveling from the north and via I-43/US 45. There are around 6,000 parking spaces.

Fans traveling via I-94 from Madison, Chicago or points south and west of Milwaukee are being asked to use the BLUE Lot, which has around 6,000 parking spots. That parking area is in Summit and located off Delafield Road, just west of Highway 67.

Police siren(Photo: File/USA TODAY NETWORK/Wisconsin)

An Elkhorn woman died Monday when her car was struck by a vehicle that ran a stop sign, Walworth County authorities said.

Allen Griffin, 32, of Delavan was driving eastbound on Territorial Road about 6 a.m., failed to stop at a stop sign and hit the passenger side of a Mazda Protégé that was southbound on Highway H.

Nancy Sanchez-Castillo, 35, a passenger in the Mazda, was pronounced dead at the scene. Griffin and the Mazda’s driver, Cesar Varela-Cuautle, 47, of Elkhorn, were taken to a hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

Republican Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (left), Gov. Scott Walker (center) and Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (right).(Photo: Associated Press)

FITCHBURG – Talks on the Wisconsin budget came to standstill Monday and one legislative leader warned that if they don't get back on track soon, the Senate and Assembly may have to deliberate separately on the state's finances.

Legislative leaders had hoped to have the budget-writing Joint Finance Committee meet Tuesday but were unable to reach enough consensus to take votes. It remains unclear if the committee will meet later in the week. 

"I'm hoping this is just a little bump in the road that we're not meeting (on Tuesday)," Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau) told reporters Monday. "If they don't meet Thursday, then we're in a rougher spot than I thought we were."

If the committee is unable to meet this week, Senate Republicans may begin to put together their own budget without the help of the Assembly, he said.

Republican Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (left), Gov. Scott Walker (center) and Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (right).(Photo: Associated Press)

FITCHBURG – Work on the state budget is stalled as Republicans who control the Legislature try to sort out their differences. 

Legislative leaders had hoped to have the budget-writing Joint Finance Committee meet on Tuesday, but were unable to reach enough consensus to take votes. It remains unclear if the committee will meet later in the week. 

Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau) said last week he believed the committee could complete its work by the middle of the month, with the full Legislature signing off on the budget around July 1, when the new budget period starts.

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