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House Speaker Paul Ryan speaks at the 2016 Republican National Convention.(Photo: Associated Press)

Conservative media outlets friendly to President Donald Trump are blaming last week's collapse of the GOP health care overhaul bill on House Speaker Paul Ryan, but a spokesman for the Janesville Republican said Monday that the relationship between the speaker and president "is stronger than ever right now."

Fox News host Jeanine Pirro, a longtime friend of Trump, railed against Ryan this weekend and called for his immediate resignation as speaker.

"Paul Ryan needs to step down as speaker of the House," Pirro said Saturday at the beginning of her show. "The reason? He failed to deliver the votes on his health care bill. The one trumpeted to repeal and replace Obamacare. The one that he had seven years to work on. The one he hid under lock and key in the basement of Congress. The one that had to be pulled to prevent the embarrassment of not having enough votes to pass.

Wisconsin Rep. John Nygren (R-Marinette), left, speaks during a news conference with Wisconsin Sen. Alberta Darling (R-River Hills), right, before a meeting of the Legislature's Joint Finance Committee.(Photo: AP)

MADISON – The Legislature’s budget committee approved legislation Monday to fight Wisconsin’s opiate epidemic.

On unanimous votes, the Joint Finance Committee signed off on bills to expand treatment, hire special agents to investigate drug crimes and establish a new charter school to treat teens with addiction. The 16-0 votes send the bills to the state Senate and Assembly, which could take them up in the coming weeks as part of a special session that is occurring at the same time as the Legislature’s regular session.

RELATED: Soaring drug deaths bring search for answers

RELATED: Gov. Walker takes action on heroin addiction

RELATED: Lawmaker confronts daughter's heroin addiction

Here’s a look at the measures:

Diversion. Counties would get more than $2 million in annual grants to treat people with drug or alcohol offenses instead of sending them to jail under Special Session Assembly Bill 2.

Wisconsin Rep. John Nygren (R-Marinette), left, speaks during a news conference with Wisconsin Sen. Alberta Darling (R-River Hills), right, before a meeting of the Legislature's Joint Finance Committee.(Photo: AP)

MADISON – The Legislature’s budget committee will take up legislation Monday to fight Wisconsin’s opiate epidemic.

The bills include ones that would expand treatment, hire special agents to investigate drug crimes and establish a new charter school to treat teens with addiction. The bills are being taken up as part of a special session that is occurring at the same time as the Legislature’s regular session.

The Republican-controlled Joint Finance Committee is to meet at 1:30 p.m. to take up the bills that are expected to generate bipartisan support.

RELATED: Soaring drug deaths bring search for answers

RELATED: Gov. Walker takes action on heroin addiction

RELATED: Lawmaker confronts daughter's heroin addiction

Here’s a look at the measures:

Diversion. Counties would get more than $2 million in annual grants to treat people with drug or alcohol offenses instead of sending them to jail under Special Session Assembly Bill 2.

Racine Mayor John Dickert announced Monday he will resign from the post in late July to become president of the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Cities Initiative.(Photo: Kristyna Wentz-Graff, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

Racine Mayor John Dickert will resign in July to take the top job with the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative, a group representing mayors of 128 Great Lakes cities in the United States and Canada.

Dickert will succeed David Ullrich as president and chief administrative officer of the Cities Initiative, the group announced Monday. Dickert confirmed the job change on the City of Racine's website.

The Cities Initiative currently is seeking a rehearing by representatives of the eight Great Lakes governors over their June 2016 approval of the City of Waukesha's request for a Lake Michigan water supply.

RELATED: Great Lakes governors approve Waukesha water request

Dickert was first elected Racine mayor in May 2009. His current term ends in April 2019.

House Speaker Paul Ryan speaks at the 2016 Republican National Convention.(Photo: Associated Press)

Conservative media outlets friendly to President Donald Trump are blaming last week's failure to pass the major GOP health care bill on House Speaker Paul Ryan.

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Washington Bureau Chief Craig Gilbert on the latest with the Obamacare replacement plan and what it could mean for Paul Ryan’s future.

Fox News host Jeanine Pirro, a longtime Trump ally, railed against the Janesville Republican this weekend and called for his immediate resignation as speaker.

"Paul Ryan needs to step down as speaker of the House," Pirro said Saturday at the beginning of her show. "The reason? He failed to deliver the votes on his health care bill. The one trumpeted to repeal and replace Obamacare. The one that he had seven years to work on.

Wisconsin Rep. John Nygren (R-Marinette), left, speaks during a news conference with Wisconsin Sen. Alberta Darling (R-River Hills), right, before a meeting of the Legislature's Joint Finance Committee.(Photo: AP)

MADISON – The Legislature’s budget committee will take up legislation Monday to fight Wisconsin’s opiate epidemic.

The bills include ones that would expand treatment, hire special agents to investigate drug crimes and establish a new charter school to treat teens with addiction. The bills are being taken up as part of a special session that is occurring at the same time as the Legislature’s regular session.

The Republican-controlled Joint Finance Committee is to meet at 1:30 p.m. to take up the bills that are expected to generate bipartisan support.

Here’s a look at the measures:

iversion. Counties would get more than $2 million in annual grants to treat people with drug or alcohol offenses instead of sending them to jail under Special Session Assembly Bill 2.

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