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Michael L. McGee(Photo: Wisconsin Department of Corrections)

The Court of Appeals on Wednesday blocked the controversial placement of a Racine County sex offender in neighboring Kenosha County, where residents and officials protested the plan to have the man live in Wheatland.

The court found that the Racine County judge who approved the placement plan for Michael L. McGee failed to follow provisions of a February 2016 state law intended to make it harder to approve supervised release of sex offenders outside their home counties.

Judge Paul Reilly wrote the 15-page decision for a panel that included judges Mark Gundrum and Lisa Neubauer, all from the Waukesha-based District II division of the appellate court.

The law had required offenders to stay in their home county absent "good cause" to select another county. Racine County Circuit Judge Allan Torhorst found that the fact there was no suitable spot in Racine County was such "good cause" to place McGee in Wheatland.

Wisconsin Badgers logo.(Photo: University of Wisconsin)

The University of Wisconsin-Madison is back in control of its Twitter account after being hacked early Wednesday. 

We're back! pic.twitter.com/v9J8oujaI5

— UW-Madison (@UWMadison) May 17, 2017

Sorry for the disruption and foul language this morning— Here’s more info on what happened. https://t.co/NdPHlrP3K4

— UW-Madison (@UWMadison) May 17, 2017

UW-Madison staff learned of the hack as the suspicious tweets were being posted, about 6:30 a.m., according to a statement. Four suspicious tweets were posted, including two with profane language.

The University of Wisconsin-Madison's Twitter account has been hacked, UW police reported Wednesday morning.(Photo: UW-Madison Twitter)

The cause of the hack has not been identified, but the University Communications plans to review its social media account security.

The account has about 160,000 followers.

 

 

 

Wisconsin Badgers logo.(Photo: University of Wisconsin)

 

 

 

The University of Wisconsin-Madison's Twitter account has been hacked, UW police reported Wednesday morning.

"Admins at @UWMadison are aware that their Twitter account has been compromised. Not to fear -- it will be back to its awesome self soon," UW police tweeted.

Several profanity laced tweets were posted on the UW's feed about 6:30 a.m. The account has about 159,000 followers.

 

 

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Rep. John Nygren (R-Marinette) istens to testimony before speaking about his daughter???s struggle with addiction.(Photo: Michael Sears)Buy Photo

MADISON – Sexual predators would have to live in their home counties when they are released, but could be placed near schools, parks and day care centers, under a plan adopted Tuesday by the Legislature’s budget committee.

The legislator behind the plan said he wanted to crack down on judges placing violent sex offenders far from their home counties.

“There is a logjam in the system now where they’re having trouble placing people in the final phase of treatment,” said Rep. Mark Born (R-Beaver Dam). “We really need to remember this is treatment and the folks who are in it have constitutional rights.”

The Joint Finance Committee approved the plan 13-3, with Rep. Katrina Shankland (D-Stevens Point) joining all Republicans in supporting it. The other Democrats on the committee said the proposal should get a hearing and be dealt with as standalone legislation.

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Rep. John Nygren (R-Marinette) istens to testimony before speaking about his daughter???s struggle with addiction.(Photo: Michael Sears)Buy Photo

MADISON – The Legislature’s budget committee plans to retain five of six elections jobs Gov. Scott Walker wants to cut, according to top lawmakers.

The Joint Finance Committee will also cut daily stipends for commissioners by half – instead of by nearly 90%, as Walker has urged.

The state received more than $50 million in federal grants to bolster its election systems under the Help America Vote Act, which Congress passed in response to problems that came to light in Florida’s razor-thin presidential results in 2000.

Now, that federal aid is running out. Walker has recommended using state taxpayer money to pay for 16 of 22 positions at the Elections Commission that had been federally funded. The other six jobs would be cut under his plan. 

But the budget committee will keep 21 of the 22 jobs, according to the leaders of the committee, Sen.

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Rep. John Nygren (R-Marinette) istens to testimony before speaking about his daughter???s struggle with addiction.(Photo: Michael Sears)Buy Photo

MADISON – The Legislature’s budget committee is slated to decide Tuesday whether to cut six positions from the state’s Elections Commission.

The Joint Finance Committee is also cued up to determine whether to slash daily stipends for commissioners by nearly 90%.

The state received more than $50 million in federal grants to bolster its election systems under the Help America Vote Act, which Congress passed in response to problems that came to light in Florida’s razor-thin presidential results in 2000.

Now, that federal aid is running out. Gov. Scott Walker has recommended using state taxpayer money to pay for 16 of 22 positions at the Elections Commission that had been federally funded.

Commissioners have lobbied for keeping all 22 jobs. Losing the six positions could mean the voter registration system won’t be maintained as well and could result in candidates having to wait longer to get on the ballot, the commission has warned.

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