News

By Steven Reinberg

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- As the U.S. population ages, millions more will face the prospect of losing their hearing, researchers report.

Among American adults 20 and older, is expected to increase from 44 million in 2020 (15 percent of adults) to 73.5 million by 2060 (23 percent of adults).

The increase will be greatest among older adults, according to the researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore. In 2020, 55 percent of all adults with will be 70 or older. In 2060, that rate will jump to 67 percent.

"In the coming decades, there will be an increased need for affordable interventions and access to hearing health care services," said lead study author Adele Goman. She's a research fellow at Hopkins' Center on Aging and Health.

Goman and her colleagues projected future using data from the U.S.

By Steven Reinberg

THURSDAY, March 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug may significantly reduce the and improve the appearance of moderate to severe , a new, preliminary trial finds.

Nemolizumab is a man-made, injectable antibody that acts against the protein that has been identified as playing a part in , the international team of researchers said.

"The treatments for [eczema] have been disappointing because of their lack of efficacy and the long-term side effects," said Dr. Doris Day, a dermatologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. She had no role in the study.

"There are also issues with compliance, since the products often need to be applied to broad areas multiple times a day," she added.

Since this is a chronic condition, continued treatment is usually needed to maintain results, Day explained.

"The goal is to find a non- treatment that is easy to follow, and with reliable results and minimal adverse effects," she said.

By Dennis Thompson

WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with -- conditions that cause a person's immune system to turn against the body -- appear to have an increased risk of developing , a new British study suggests.

Researchers found that 18 out of 25 different autoimmune diseases, such as , or , "showed a statistically significant association with dementia," said study co-author Dr. Michael Goldacre. He's a professor of public health at the University of Oxford.

But Goldacre and other experts stressed that the study didn't prove that autoimmune diseases cause dementia. The research only showed that these conditions are associated with a higher risk of dementia.

Specifically, the study found that people with appeared to have nearly double the risk of dementia. was associated with a 29 percent increased risk of dementia. was linked to a 46 percent increased risk, and with a 13 percent increased risk.

By Dennis Thompson

WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with -- conditions that cause a person's immune system to turn against the body -- appear to have an increased risk of developing , a new British study suggests.

Researchers found that 18 out of 25 different autoimmune diseases, such as , or , "showed a statistically significant association with dementia," said study co-author Dr. Michael Goldacre. He's a professor of public health at the University of Oxford.

But Goldacre and other experts stressed that the study didn't prove that autoimmune diseases cause dementia. The research only showed that these conditions are associated with a higher risk of dementia.

Specifically, the study found that people with appeared to have nearly double the risk of dementia. was associated with a 29 percent increased risk of dementia. was linked to a 46 percent increased risk, and with a 13 percent increased risk.

By Maureen Salamon

WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An implanted device that provides electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve leading to the enhanced arm movement in a small group of patients, researchers report.

Evaluating 17 stroke patients with chronic arm weakness who also received intense , scientists found that three-quarters improved with vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), while only one-quarter of those receiving "sham" nerve stimulation did.

"Arm weakness affects three of every four of our patients and persists to a disabling degree in at least 50 percent of them, so it's a hugely important problem in the long term," explained study author Dr. Jesse Dawson. He's director of the Scottish Research Network and a clinical researcher at University of Glasgow.

"A unique aspect of this [device] is that patients can deliver the brain stimulation technique in their own home during exercise .

By Alan Mozes

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Getting care at a hospital for a psychiatric disorder may be linked to a higher risk of in the following weeks and months, new research suggests.

People who sought care at a hospital for serious conditions -- such as , or post-traumatic disorder -- faced a tripled risk of following their visit, the study authors contended.

The risk started to decrease after 30 days, but remained twice as high for at least a year after the ER visit or hospital stay, the researchers said.

"We have known for some time that people who have a seem to be at an increased risk for later on developing some sort of psychiatric illness, or post-stroke ," said study lead author Jonah Zuflacht. He's a fourth-year medical student at Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City.

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