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A new exhibit at the Wisconsin Veterans Museum titled "WWI Beyond the Trenches: Stories from the Front" will be on display for two years.(Photo: Andy Manis / for the Journal Sentinel)

Madison - It's impossible to tell the stories of all 122,000 Wisconsinites who served in uniform during World War I.

So the Wisconsin Veterans Museum chose Helen Bulovsky, John Isermann, Arthur Cantwell and Mortimer Lawrence to tell their stories of sacrifice, gung-ho patriotism and heroism in a war that was supposed to end all wars.

Using uniforms, weapons, photos, personal journals, letters and oral histories from its archives, the Wisconsin Veterans Museum in Madison this week opened a new exhibit to coincide with the 100th anniversary of America joining the fight in Europe - "WW1 Beyond the Trenches: Stories from the Front."

"This will give us the opportunity to tell the stories from our collection, which are many and varied, and tell them in a way we've never done before," Wisconsin Veterans Museum Director Michael Telzrow said on Wednesday as employees finished installing the exhibit.

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The Kinnard dairy farm in Kewaukee County milks 6,500 dairy cattle through a CAFO (concentrated animal feeding operations). The county has a problem with contaminated wells but the Kinnards say their precise manure measurement prevents run-off. Rick Wood/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

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From left, Amanda Hintz and Michelle Schmitt feed day-old calves at the Kinnard dairy farm in Kewaunee County.(Photo: Rick Wood, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo

Town of Lincoln - Lee Kinnard’s new barn stretches the length of six football fields. It’s so big he once flew a drone inside to get a bird’s eye view of all the cows.

The family farm milks 6,500 cows in Kewaunee County, where the cattle population has grown faster than anywhere in the state.

Since 1983, cattle numbers in the county have jumped by 62% to 97,000 at a time when the statewide cattle population has tumbled by 20%, according to the state agriculture department.

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For decades George Webb restaurants had been predicting that Milwaukee's baseball team would win 12 games in a row. In April, 1987, it finally came true. Wochit

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Mary Beth Unglaub with her George Webb T-shirt from the big burger giveaway at the George Webb Restaurant at 7105 S. 76th St. in Franklin. She has worked at that restaurant since 1981.(Photo: Michael Sears, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo

It was the day the Brewers beat George Webb.

Thirty years ago this Saturday thousands of people stood in line in the rain to collect on a promise made by George Webb, who by then had been dead for three decades.

Webb, the quirky, iconoclastic restaurant owner who installed two clocks right next to each other in his restaurants for no discernible reason, had predicted Milwaukee's baseball team would some day win a dozen games in a row.

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Fuel tankers wait in line at the U.S. Oil facility on N. 107 St. in Milwaukee to fill up at the large fuel storage facility located there. Lines became longer in 2016 after the West Shore Pipe Line Co. closed its fuel line from Milwaukee to Green Bay.(Photo: Michael Sears / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo

An Illinois company will not replace its deteriorated 110-mile fuel pipeline between Milwaukee and Green Bay, state Administration Secretary Scott Neitzel said Friday.

West Shore Pipe Line Co. in June 2016 permanently shut down the only gasoline and diesel fuel pipeline serving northeastern Wisconsin after testing of the 56-year-old line found extensive repairs were needed. At that time, West Shore representatives said the company was evaluating options for rebuilding the line within two years.

The old repair-plagued line was removed from service last March for the testing and it never reopened.

Since March, state officials have worked with gasoline retail businesses to maintain an adequate fuel supply in the region at a reasonable price for consumers, Neitzel said.

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Celebrate Earth Day with breathtaking photos of our planet from space! VPC

Stan Temple, University of Wisconsin-Madison emeritus professor of forest and wildlife ecology and senior fellow at the Aldo Leopold Foundation, is pictured in the snowy woods near the historic Aldo Leopold Shack in rural Baraboo, Wis., during winter on Dec. 6, 2010. (Photo by Jeff Miller/UW-Madison)(Photo: Jeff Miller, University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Radio broadcasts by famed Wisconsin conservationist Aldo Leopold 80 years ago have been recreated as part of this year's Earth Day celebration.

Original recordings of the broadcasts don't exist, but the scripts do, and portions have been recorded by Stan Temple, a University of Wisconsin-Madison conservation professor emeritus. The broadcasts originally aired on Madison's WHA radio station, which is now part of the Wisconsin Public Radio network.

The broadcasts began airing in 1933 after Leopold joined UW-Madison as the chair of game management.