State

The FBI released an enhanced image (right) of what Joseph Jakubowski (left) would look bald in the belief that the fugitive may have altered his appearance.(Photo: FBI)

A letter from someone purporting to be manhunt subject Joseph Jakubowski threatens violence Easter Sunday against churches in the Sussex area, the Waukesha sheriff's office said Thursday.

The threat of unspecified violence against unspecified churches was sent through the U.S. Postal Service, but authorities have not been able to substantiate the threat nor its author, according to a news release from the office.

Waukesha County residents are asked to be vigilant and to report any suspicious activity, and authorities are working with area churches to review safety plans for Easter Sunday, the office said.

The manhunt prompted the cancellation of the annual Governor’s Easter Egg Hunt. Gov. Scott Walker’s office cited the search in cancelling the event, scheduled for Saturday.

A nationwide search has been launched for Jakubowski, 32, who is suspected of stealing firearms from a Janesville gun shop, including an automatic weapon, and threatening to use them on public officials or a school, according to the Rock County Sheriff's Office.

The FBI released an enhanced image (right) of what Joseph Jakubowski (left) would look bald in the belief that the fugitive may have altered his appearance.(Photo: FBI)

Officials conducting a nationwide manhunt for a Janesville man who stole weapons and threatened violence in a manifesto said Thursday they have received no information to suggest the fugitive is getting help to evade capture.

Janesville Police Chief David Moore and Rock County Sheriff Robert Spoden said authorities have received more than 700 tips in the nationwide search for Joseph Jakubowski, 32, who has been at-large for a week. The tips have largely come from local and state residents, with a few originating as far away as Texas and Oklahoma, they said.

Spoden said investigators can’t rule out Jakubowski is being aided by accomplices, but “right now we just don’t have the information or evidence that anybody is assisting him.”

Authorities continued their calls for Jakubowski to turn himself in, noting that nobody has been hurt.

Gov. Scott Walker says he has made budgetary moves to free up anothter $100 million for Wisconsin roads. Here, eastbound traffic on I-94 near the State Fairgrounds backs up due to construction last summer.(Photo: Sam caravana / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

MADISON - State officials project another $38 million in revenue that can be used to fund transportation projects in the upcoming budget.

Gov. Scott Walker also said Thursday he is directing the state Department of Transportation to advance $65 million in projects statewide into the 2017 fiscal year.

"In total, these actions free up more than $100 million in funds for additional transportation projects due to new revenues and savings," Walker said.

Transportation has been an extremely contentious issue in state budget discussions, with Walker battling allies like Assembly Speaker Robin Vos of Rochester and other GOP leaders over the issue.

The state DOT will fund another 21 projects around the state in June, DOT Secretary Dave Ross said.

Gov. Scott Walker says he has made budgetary moves to free up anothter $100 million for Wisconsin roads. Here, eastbound traffic on I-94 near the State Fairgrounds backs up due to construction last summer.(Photo: Sam caravana / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

MADISON - State officials project another $38 million in revenue that can be used to fund transportation projects in the upcoming budget.

Gov. Scott Walker also said Thursday he is directing the state Department of Transportation to advance $65 million in projects statewide into the 2017 fiscal year.

"In total, these actions free up more than $100 million in funds for additional transportation projects due to new revenues and savings," Walker said.

Transportation has been an extremely contentious issue in state budget discussions, with Walker battling allies like Assembly Speaker Robin Vos of Rochester and other GOP leaders over the issue.

Wisconsin Quest card.(Photo: Wisconsin Department of Health Services)

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services will pay a $7 million penalty to the federal government to resolve allegations that the agency made false claims of low error rates in its administration of a nutrition assistance program formerly known as food stamps, federal officials said Wednesday.

An investigation found that the agency's reported low error rates earned it performance bonuses for 2009, 2010 and 2011 that it was not entitled to, Acting U.S. Attorney Jeffrey M. Anderson for the Western District of Wisconsin said in a statement.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture provides eligible low-income persons and families with financial assistance to buy nutritious food through a Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, known as SNAP.

The state health services agency administers the program in Wisconsin and determines whether applicants are eligible for benefits. In Wisconsin, the program is known as Food Share.

The USDA reimburses states for a portion of their administrative expenses.