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Rep. John Nygren (R-Marinette) istens to testimony before speaking about his daughter???s struggle with addiction.(Photo: Michael Sears)Buy Photo

MADISON – Sexual predators would have to live in their home counties when they are released, but could be placed near schools, parks and day care centers, under a plan adopted Tuesday by the Legislature’s budget committee.

The legislator behind the plan said he wanted to crack down on judges placing violent sex offenders far from their home counties.

“There is a logjam in the system now where they’re having trouble placing people in the final phase of treatment,” said Rep. Mark Born (R-Beaver Dam). “We really need to remember this is treatment and the folks who are in it have constitutional rights.”

The Joint Finance Committee approved the plan 13-3, with Rep. Katrina Shankland (D-Stevens Point) joining all Republicans in supporting it. The other Democrats on the committee said the proposal should get a hearing and be dealt with as standalone legislation.

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Rep. John Nygren (R-Marinette) istens to testimony before speaking about his daughter???s struggle with addiction.(Photo: Michael Sears)Buy Photo

MADISON – The Legislature’s budget committee plans to retain five of six elections jobs Gov. Scott Walker wants to cut, according to top lawmakers.

The Joint Finance Committee will also cut daily stipends for commissioners by half – instead of by nearly 90%, as Walker has urged.

The state received more than $50 million in federal grants to bolster its election systems under the Help America Vote Act, which Congress passed in response to problems that came to light in Florida’s razor-thin presidential results in 2000.

Now, that federal aid is running out. Walker has recommended using state taxpayer money to pay for 16 of 22 positions at the Elections Commission that had been federally funded. The other six jobs would be cut under his plan. 

But the budget committee will keep 21 of the 22 jobs, according to the leaders of the committee, Sen.

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Rep. John Nygren (R-Marinette) istens to testimony before speaking about his daughter???s struggle with addiction.(Photo: Michael Sears)Buy Photo

MADISON – The Legislature’s budget committee is slated to decide Tuesday whether to cut six positions from the state’s Elections Commission.

The Joint Finance Committee is also cued up to determine whether to slash daily stipends for commissioners by nearly 90%.

The state received more than $50 million in federal grants to bolster its election systems under the Help America Vote Act, which Congress passed in response to problems that came to light in Florida’s razor-thin presidential results in 2000.

Now, that federal aid is running out. Gov. Scott Walker has recommended using state taxpayer money to pay for 16 of 22 positions at the Elections Commission that had been federally funded.

Commissioners have lobbied for keeping all 22 jobs. Losing the six positions could mean the voter registration system won’t be maintained as well and could result in candidates having to wait longer to get on the ballot, the commission has warned.

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A man was found dead on the shoulder of state Highway 113 in Dane County late Saturday.

The victim's name was not released Sunday by the Dane County Sheriff's Department. He was found shortly before midnight on the shoulder of Highway 113 at County Highway M in the town of Westport.

Authorities believe a vehicle traveling south on Highway 113 struck the man and fled the scene, most likely continuing south onto Northport Drive in Madison. The vehicle may be gray, silver or tan and may have front end damage in the headlight area.

Anyone with information about the hit-and-run fatality should contact the Dane County Sheriff's Department, (608) 284-6900.

 

Gladys Harris of Milwaukee holds some of the forms of identification she brought with her to the polls in the 2016 presidential election. She was unable to vote because she had lost her driver's license a few days before and thought one of the many other cards she had with her would work. She was given a provisional ballot but was unable to return with a proper ID in time. It was the first presidential election to be held under a new state law requiring a driver's license, state ID, passport, military ID, naturalization papers or tribal ID to vote.(Photo: Associated Press)

State Sen. Mary Lazich was adamant: The bill Republicans were about to push through the Wisconsin state Senate, requiring that voters present identification at the polls, would do no harm.

“Not a single voter in this state will be disenfranchised by the ID law,” Lazich promised.

Five years later, in the first presidential election held under the new law, Gladys Harris proved her wrong.