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Prairie Lake Estate Mobile Park, about 40 miles north of Eau Claire, is recovering from a tornado that killed a 45-year-old man, injured at least 25 people and destroyed several mobile homes. Chelsey Lewis/Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

CHETEK, Wis. - The Barron County Sheriff’s Department has released initial damage estimates from a tornado that tore through the Chetek area of northwestern Wisconsin last week.

The department said Sunday that the storm damaged 231 homes and four commercial properties across the county, though those number are likely to change. The storm caused about $10 million in damages, not including damage to trees. That includes $5 million to personal property and the rest to commercial property.

RELATED:1 dead as tornado devastates mobile home park in northwestern Wisconsin

One man was killed and about two dozen others were injured when the twister struck Tuesday evening.

The investigation into a police shooting of a hostage during a standoff in Neenah helped lead to changes and written policies for future such state investigations of officer-involved fatal shootings.(Photo: Ron Page, USA TODAY NETWORK-Wisconsin)

MADISON - For the first time, the Wisconsin Department of Justice has formalized its guidelines for independently investigating police shootings — the latest step in the state’s efforts to be a national leader on the issue.

Before April, the state investigators charged with reviewing police shootings were relying on their agency’s general guidelines for investigations and even in some cases on unwritten understandings about how to handle these specific cases. 

Going forward, state agents will be able to say — literally — that they're handling these sensitive investigations by the book. 

The stakes could not be higher: public turmoil over shootings has resulted in riots in cities around the nation in recent years, including last summer in Milwaukee.

This is an aerial view of a northwestern Wisconsin frac sand mining operation.(Photo: BanksPhotos/istock stock photo, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

A timber company's plans to develop a $65 million sand processing facility between Tomah and Black River Falls that would destroy a large swath of wetlands were approved by the Department of Natural Resources on Friday.

Meteor Timber is proposing to construct a plant and rail transfer site in Monroe County where sand from a nearby mine it owns would be shipped to drillers in Texas and North Dakota, where production is ramping up.

Sand is a key ingredient in fracking and is used under pressure with water to prop open pockets of oil and gas.

Meteor, a large private landowner with extensive forest holdings in the Wisconsin, has touted the economics of the project and its willingness to take extra steps to make up for the loss of wetlands.

But environmentalists have been critical of the company's plans because of the large wetlands loss and potential harm to wildlife and the ecosystem.

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After more than 140 years, the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus is calling it quits. Video provided by Newsy Newslook

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Candice Storley performs with elephants Friday at the Circus World Museum in Baraboo, on its opening day of the summer season.(Photo: Mark Hoffman, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo

BARABOO - The calls began shortly after the stunning announcement in January.

Callers want to know if it's true Circus World Museum is closing down on Sunday?

They’re told — no, that’s the famed Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, the same circus that started here in the Ringling brothers’ hometown more than a century ago.

Circus World Museum is thriving, as are dozens of other small circuses around the U.S. But the death of The Greatest Show on Earth, which performs its final show on Sunday in New York, is the end of a storied era that started in this Sauk County community.

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Netflix says it will add more trigger warning to its show “13 Reasons Why”, given its graphic depiction of sexual assault and suicide. Maria Mercedes Galuppo (@mariamgaluppo) has more. Buzz60

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Kristin Kowalke and her son Jordyn Kowalke, 17, before his baseball game in Pewaukee.(Photo: Michael Sears / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo

Last month when Kristin Kowalke's son told her he was watching a new Netflix series, the Pewaukee mother of three decided to view the show herself. She was immediately hooked on 13 Reasons Why, the controversial drama-mystery about a teenager who kills herself after creating tape recordings for the people who she says drove her to take her life.

Jordyn Kowalke, a senior at Pewaukee High School, re-watched many of the episodes with his mother and gamely fielded her questions. Were his classmates as mean to each other as the students depicted in the show? Are high school parties today really that crazy?