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Thirty years ago, Tommy Thompson became the 42nd governor of Wisconsin, beginning the most dominant political run in the history of that office. Wochit

Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson gestures to the crowd as he gives a speech after taking his oath of office during the inauguration ceremony in the Capitol rotunda Jan. 4, 1999, in Madison. Watching is Thompson's wife, Sue Ann. The day marked the start of Thompson's unprecedented fourth term as Wisconsin governor.(Photo: Associated Press)

MADISON - A leadership center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison will carry the name of former Gov. Tommy Thompson, honoring the longest-serving head of the state on the 30th anniversary of his taking office, sources confirmed. 

The Republican governor had a storied career that stretches back a half century — from his hometown of Elroy to the statehouse to Washington, D.C.

Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson gestures to the crowd as he gives a speech after taking his oath of office during the inauguration ceremony in the Capitol rotunda Jan. 4, 1999, in Madison. Watching is Thompson's wife, Sue Ann. The day marked the start of Thompson's unprecedented fourth term as Wisconsin governor.(Photo: Associated Press)

MADISON - A leadership center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison will carry the name of former Gov. Tommy Thompson, honoring the longest-serving head of the state on the 30th anniversary of his taking office, sources confirmed. 

The Republican governor had a storied career that stretches back a half century -- from his hometown of Elroy to the statehouse and on to Washington, D.C. 

Thompson served as governor of Wisconsin for a record 14 years, winning four elections and leaving only to become federal Health and Human Services secretary under then President George W. Bush. 

Gov. Scott Walker, Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (R-Rochester) and Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau) are scheduled to make the announcement on Tuesday at the Capitol.

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The Wisconsin statue atop of the State Capitol is shown Thursday, July 7, 2016 in Madison, Wis.(Photo: Mark Hoffman, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo

MADISON – The Legislature’s budget committee is to decide Tuesday whether to go along with Gov. Scott Walker’s plan to cut college tuition – an idea key lawmakers have been reluctant to embrace.

Tuition at University of Wisconsin schools has been frozen for undergraduates from Wisconsin since 2013 and Walker wants to trim it by 5% in the fall of 2018.

But many of Walker’s fellow Republicans who control the Legislature have signaled they may not go along with his idea, with some saying they are willing to allow a modest increase in tuition.

The Joint Finance Committee is to take up the issue Tuesday, along with drug testing participants in work programs and numerous other issues. The committee will reshape the budget over the coming weeks and then send it to the Senate and Assembly for their approval.

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The Wisconsin statue atop of the State Capitol is shown Thursday, July 7, 2016 in Madison, Wis.(Photo: Mark Hoffman, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo

MADISON – The Legislature’s budget committee is to decide Tuesday whether to go along with Gov. Scott Walker’s plan to cut college tuition – an idea key lawmakers have been reluctant to embrace.

Tuition at University of Wisconsin schools has been frozen for undergraduates from Wisconsin since 2013 and Walker wants to trim it by 5% in the fall of 2018.

But many of Walker’s fellow Republicans who control the Legislature have signaled they may not go along with his idea, with some saying they are willing to allow a modest increase in tuition.

The Joint Finance Committee is to take up the issue Tuesday, along with drug testing participants in work programs and numerous other issues. The committee will reshape the budget over the coming weeks and then send it to the Senate and Assembly for their approval.

Measures for Justice is a nonprofit that just launched a free website that allows users to research county-level criminal justice data.(Photo: Measures for Justice)

A free new online tool that allows anyone to explore detailed information about criminal justice in Wisconsin, and compare metrics among counties or other states, is set to launch Tuesday.

A user could check something as simple as how many resisting arrest cases were filed in a county, or break down the age, ethnicity and indigence of the subjects and compare the results with another county or counties. 

Another example: the Florida data showed the median jail term for nonviolent misdemeanors ranged from 12 days in one county to 180 days in another, the kind of information that can bring about efforts to find out why such disparities exist.

The ambitious offering comes from Measures for Justice, a nonprofit that has been building its system for more than five years.