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Two years after Gov. Scott Walker proposed cutting K-12 funding, he is moving sharply in the opposite direction. Wochit

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The Wisconsin State Capitol is seen in Madison, Wis. on Thursday, September 22, 2015.(Photo: Mike De Sisti / This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)Buy Photo

MADISON – Top Republican lawmakers said Wednesday they would reject Gov. Scott Walker's plans to eliminate the state's outdoors magazine, but would cut it back from six issues a year to four. 

The budget-writing Joint Finance Committee will also allow the governor's natural resources secretary to set higher fees at Wisconsin's most popular state parks, said the leaders of the committee, Sen. Alberta Darling (R-River Hills) and Rep. John Nygren (R-Marinette). 

Darling and Nygren announced they would go along with a Walker proposal to cut property taxes by $180 million over two years, but they put off a vote on the issue.

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Two years after Gov. Scott Walker proposed cutting K-12 funding, he is moving sharply in the opposite direction. Wochit

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The Wisconsin State Capitol is seen in Madison, Wis. on Thursday, September 22, 2015.(Photo: Mike De Sisti / This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)Buy Photo

MADISON – Top Republican lawmakers said Wednesday they would go along with GOP Gov. Scott Walker’s plan to cut property taxes by $180 million over the next two years.

The leaders of the budget-writing Joint Finance Committee put off a vote on the issue Wednesday but said they were committed to eliminating the state portion of property tax bills, saving the owner of a median-valued home $26. 

The committee on Wednesday will reject the GOP governor's plans to get rid of the state's natural resources magazine, but will cut it back from six issues a year to four, said the co-chairs of the committee, Sen.

Plymouth high school student Brylan Weisensel displays the red, white and blue graduation cord the local American Legion post sent to grads headed to military service(Photo: Facebook image)

As Brylan Weisensel approached the end of his senior year at Plymouth Comprehensive High School, he didn’t expect to wear any cords at graduation this upcoming Sunday.

When members of the local American Legion post’s auxiliary sent him a red, white and blue cord to honor Weisensel’s post-grad plans for the Navy, he was touched. Weisensel is one of a handful of students at the Sheboygan County school going into military service after graduation.

But then, he learned from another classmate that their principal had said the students couldn’t wear the cap ords to graduation because they weren’t part of a school-sponsored group or activity.

So Weisensel took to Facebook, writing a public post explaining the situation: “Some of my classmates with plans to serve have decided they are going to say screw it and wear the cord anyway.

A map tweeted by Google's News Lab team shows the top searched "how to spell" query by state.(Photo: GoogleTrends)

Wisconsin residents have trouble spelling their state's name, Google said Wednesday, a flip-flop by the search giant that wound up coming full circle.

A map published Tuesday by Google Trends showed spelling searches by state between Jan. 1 and April 30, and indicated that for Wisconsin the most-searched "how to spell" word was "Wisconsin."

That led to many stories — including one on JSOnline — and widespread social media ridicule about residents not being able to spell the name of their own state — a word that's easily sounded out. 

We've made a few corrections to the legend. This is the one to use pic.twitter.com/0Z8fUlzmHc

— GoogleTrends (@GoogleTrends) May 30, 2017

However, the map conflicted with a list provided to USA Today on Friday that showed the most-searched word in Wisconsin was actually "tomorrow.

West Bend East high school shares a campus with West High School.(Photo: West Bend School District)

Seven days before summer break, West Bend East and West High School saw an unusual staffing change: Four of the six English teachers resigned Friday, throwing students into a lurch before finals and prompting vast speculation about the cause of the departures.

While students protested, the district released a statement that declined to name the teachers and only said that the resignations were "in no way related to any opinions expressed about curriculum."

Whatever the specifics, the departures top an unusually turbulent year in West Bend. The Washington County district has long had fractious relations between some of its teachers, school board members and administrators, but a number of recent developments in short succession have raised new concerns.

Consider that in the past year:

A new superintendent, Erik Olson, replaced departing district leader Ted Neitzke.Therese Sizer resigned from the West Bend School Board in March after members passed a policy that prohibited board members from voting on measures that affect any direct relatives.