Health

By Alan Mozes

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Getting care at a hospital for a psychiatric disorder may be linked to a higher risk of in the following weeks and months, new research suggests.

People who sought care at a hospital for serious conditions -- such as , or post-traumatic disorder -- faced a tripled risk of following their visit, the study authors contended.

The risk started to decrease after 30 days, but remained twice as high for at least a year after the ER visit or hospital stay, the researchers said.

"We have known for some time that people who have a seem to be at an increased risk for later on developing some sort of psychiatric illness, or post-stroke ," said study lead author Jonah Zuflacht. He's a fourth-year medical student at Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City.

By Alan Mozes

THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A large new analysis suggests there may some type of link between and the risk for .

However, the study can't prove that one condition causes the other -- or even which direction the link might travel, the researchers said.

For example, maybe Parkinson's somehow raises a person's odds for ischemic -- the type that's caused by a clot and makes up the vast majority of strokes. Or, it could be that having a stroke weakens the brain, raising the risk that a patient will develop Parkinson's.

Or, as one expert who reviewed the findings said, a separate, unknown factor might independently link the two conditions.

"There may be some processes that occur with aging that increase the risk of both and neurodegenerative disorders" such as Parkinson's, said Dr. Andrew Feigin, a neurologist at Northwell Health's Neuroscience Institute in Manhasset, N.Y.

By Dennis Thompson

MONDAY, Feb. 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- One-quarter of U.S. teen e-cigarette users have experimented with "dripping" -- a new vaping method that produces thicker clouds of vapor, researchers report.

Regular produce inhalable vapor by gradually drawing liquid into a heating coil through an automatic wick, explained lead researcher Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin.

"Dripping" involves placing drops of e-liquid directly onto the exposed heating coil of an e-cigarette or atomizer, and then immediately inhaling the cloud of vapor produced, said Krishnan-Sarin, a professor of at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn.

"They say it makes the flavors taste better and gives you a stronger hit," Krishnan-Sarin said.

She said she learned about the practice while talking with teenagers, and decided to ask about it in a survey on e-cigarette use among high school students.

The survey revealed that 26 percent of student e-cigarette users at eight Connecticut high schools had tried dripping at least once.

Feb. 6, 2017 -- Possible contamination with pentobarbital has led to the recall of certain lots of 12-oz Hunk of Beef dog food.

Dogs that consume pentobarbital can suffer drowsiness, dizziness, excitement, loss of balance, nausea, and possibly death.

The recalled lots of dog food were made during the week of June 6-13, 2016, and distributed to retail locations and sold online in Washington, California, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts, Maryland, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.

The recall includes products with lot numbers that start with 1816E03HB, 1816E04HB, 1816E06HB, 1816E07HB, and 1816E13HB, and have an expiration date of June 2020. The second half of the barcode reads 20109, which can be found on the back of the product label.

For more information, contact the company at 1-847-537-0102.

       

By Randy Dotinga

             

THURSDAY, Feb. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Painkillers like aspirin, Aleve and Advil don't help most people with back pain, a new review finds.

The researchers estimated that only one in six people gained a benefit from taking these nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Meanwhile, previous research has suggested that another common painkiller, Tylenol (acetaminophen), isn't very useful either, the study authors added.

The findings raise the prospect that no over-the-counter painkillers really ease back pain, at least in the short term, and some may raise the risk of gastrointestinal problems.

"There are other effective and safer strategies to manage spinal pain," said review author Gustavo Machado. He is a research fellow with the George Institute for Global Health in Sydney, Australia.

Back and neck pain are the leading cause of pain worldwide, the researchers said.